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Telecommunications (BA)

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Sample Degree Plan Courses

The following is a list of courses based on sample degree plan. Other requirements may be necessary to complete this degree.

General Education

The baccalaureate degree General Education program consists of 45 credits that are distributed among two General Education components:    1. (1) Skills (15 credits) and    2. (2) Knowledge Domains (30 credits) in the Natural Sciences, Arts, Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences, and Health and Physical Activity. Every baccalaureate degree student also completes the First-Year Seminar, United States Cultures and International Cultures, and Writing Across the Curriculum requirements.A restriction is placed on students in majors that are closely linked to the Knowledge Domains of Natural Sciences, Arts, Humanities, and Social and Behavioral Sciences to ensure that they participate in the full breadth of General Education. These students may not use a course in their academic major to satisfy one of the Knowledge Domains requirements. For example, an Economics major may not use an economics course to fulfill his/her social and behavioral sciences requirement. Also, students may not count courses cross-listed with courses in their major to fulfill one of the General Education Knowledge Domain, e.g., a Theatre major may not register for THEA 208 (GA;US;IL) / AAAS 208 (GA;US;IL) and have it count in the Arts requirement. Flexibility of the Baccalaureate Degree General Education Requirements Penn State wants students to use General Education to experiment and explore, to take academic risks, to discover things they did not know before, and to learn to do things they have not done before. To that end, the General Education program extends the concept of flexibility to all aspects of the degree program.Students may, with the permission of their adviser and dean's representative:    1. Substitute a 200- to 499-level course in an area of General Education for a course found on the General Education list. For example, a student may take a 400-level course in history and use it to meet the General Education requirement satisfied by a comparable lower- level history course.   2. Substitute a foreign language at the twelfth credit level of proficiency, as measured by the Penn State foreign language offerings, for 3 credits in any of the categories of General Education. Baccalaureate degree students may substitute study in a foreign/second language at the twelfth credit level of proficiency or higher for any three credits in any of the categories of general education only if those three credits are in language study beyond their degree requirements.*    3. Substitute a third course in one of the Knowledge Domains areas of Arts, Humanities, or Social and Behavioral Sciences for a second course in one of the other areas. For example, a student might take 3 courses in the Arts, two courses in the Humanities, and only one course in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. This substitution is often referred to as the 9-6-3 sequence, representing the 9 credits, 6 credits, and 3 credits completed in place of the specified 6-6-6.*    4. Meet the United States Cultures (US) and International Cultures (IL) requirement through completion of an experiential learning program or practicum (one-semester or year long) approved by their College Dean's Office. Approved Penn State Education Abroad Programs may be used to satisfy the International Cultures (IL) requirement.   5. Meet the First-Year Seminar (FYS) requirement through completion of a FYS course offered by any unit of the University. Thus, a student who successfully completes a FYS course in one college, prior to transferring to another college, will not be required to complete another FYS. However, since there are various modes of offering a FYS throughout the University, students transferring to a new college may find that a required course that is also a FYS must still be taken.      *The use of these two substitutions (No. 2 and No. 3 above), either alone or in combination, may not lead to the complete elimination of any area in the skills or knowledge domains categories in the student's general education program.

All courses must be taken and any degree course group requirements (if any) must be met.

Skills

All courses must be taken and any degree course group requirements (if any) must be met.

Writing/Speaking

Courses with the GWS designation satisfy this component.It is the objective of these courses to teach students to communicate information clearly and set forth their beliefs persuasively both orally and in writing. In particular, it is expected that students become sufficiently proficient in writing, such that their expository prose meets the expectations of educated readers in both form and style.

9.0 Hrs. required.

A S M Contextual Integration of Communication Skills for the Technical Workplace
2.0
A S M Contextual Integration of Leadership Skills for the Technical Workplace
2.0
B E Contextual Integration of Leadership Skills for the Technical Workplace
2.0
CAS Effective Speech
3.0

Quantification

MATH 220 is 2-3 credits.Courses with the GQ designation satisfy this component The objective of the quantification courses is to teach the students to work with numbers so as to measure space, time, mass, forces, and probabilities; to reason quantitatively; and to apply basic mathematical processes to daily work and everyday living.

6.0 Hrs. required.

CMPSC Introduction to C++ Programming
3.0
CMPSC Introduction To C++ Programming
3.0

Knowledge Domains

All courses must be taken and any degree course group requirements (if any) must be met.

Health and Physcial Activity

KINES 001 is 1.5-3 credits.KINES 029, 029S, 044, 046, 072, and 090 are 1-1.5 credits.KINES 084 is 1.5-2 credits.KINES 096 is .5-3 credits.Courses with the GHA designation satisfy this component Courses in the Health and Physical Activity area focus on the theory and practice of life span wellness and fitness activities, and on the knowledge, attitudes, habits, and skills needed to live well. The courses include such diverse topics as diet, exercise, stress management, the wise use of leisure time, alcohol consumption and drug use, sexual health awareness, and safety education. Courses may be knowledge-focused (about aspects of the biological, social, and behavioral aspects of healthful living) or practice-focused (emphasize attitudes, habits, and skills needed to engage in healthful living and can include traditional dance, exercise, and sport activity classes) or integrated in any manner.

3.0 Hrs. required.

BB H Values and Health Behavior
1.5
BB H Introduction to Biobehavioral Health
3.0

Natural Sciences

CHEM 101 and 101S are 2-3 credits.PHYS 211L and 212L are 0-4 credits.Courses with the GN designation satisfy this component The Natural Sciences reveal the order, diversity, and beauty of nature and in so doing enable students to develop a greater appreciation of the world around them. These courses help students to understand the nature of science through exposure to the broad divisions of science--physical science, biological science, earth science, and applied natural science. In these courses the students will be taught how to acquire scientific factual information, to use scientific methodology and to develop an appreciation of the natural world. Students should gain an understanding of how scientists reason and how they draw conclusions and think critically.

9.0 Hrs. required.

AAA S Environments Of Africa: Geology And Climate Change
3.0
AERSP Space Sci Tech Xlist W Sts 055
3.0
AGECO Plant Stress: It's Not Easy Being Green
3.0

Arts

THEA 080 is 1-3 credits.Courses with the GA designation satisfy this component Courses taught in the area of the Arts are expected to help students understand and appreciate some of the more important creative works, traditions, literature, and history of the arts and architecture. General Education Arts courses aim to teach students to recognize the comprehensive role of arts and architecture as an expression of the cultural values of a society and the need to preserve these expressions for the benefit of future generations.Through the courses in the Arts area, students should recognize aesthetic values as an integral part of society's essential need and gain lifelong benefits through the acquisition and appreciation of arts-related skills. Students should become conversant with the terminology, techniques, attitudes, ideas, and skills that the arts comprise so as to understand how humankind relates to the arts.

6.0 Hrs. required.

BRASS Trumpet: Secondary
1.0
BRASS French Horn: Secondary
1.0
BRASS Trombone: Secondary
1.0
BRASS Euphonium: Secondary
1.0
BRASS Tuba: Secondary
1.0
INART Fundamentals of Digital Audio
1.0

Humanities

Courses with the GH designation satisfy this component Humanistic studies are divided into four categories:    1. (1)literature,    2. (2)history and culture,    3. (3)advanced language, and    4. (4)philosophy.The study of the Humanities should develop competency in interpretive understanding of the human condition and of the values inherent in it. This interpretive understanding should evolve into the development of insights and a critical evaluation of the meaning of life, in its everyday details as well as in its historical and universal dimensions. Through this development students should acquire knowledge of and concern for the humanistic values that motivate and inform all humanistic studies.

2 courses required.

AAA S First-Year Seminar in African and African American Studies
3.0
AAA S First-year Seminar In African And African American Studies
3.0

Social and Behavioral Sciences

PL SC 177 is 1-3 credits.Courses with the GS designation satisfy this component Social and Behavioral Sciences courses develop students' understanding of the diverse personal, interpersonal, and societal forces that shape people's lives and teach them how to approach these subjects through the concepts, principles, and methods of scientific inquiry. The general goal is a theoretical understanding of the interrelationships of the determinants of the organization of human behavior. These courses are expected to introduce students to the scientific analysis of:    1. (1) the forms, practices, and theories of politics;    2. (2) the nature and operation of economic analysis;    3. (3) the interrelationships of social institutions;    4. (4) the dynamics of individual and group behavior and change; and    5. (5) the processes and functions of human communication.Through the application of the methodologies of the Social and Behavioral Sciences, students should develop an understanding of the multiple nature of causality in social settings. The Social and Behavioral Sciences require a comprehensive, integrative, empirical, and theoretical view of the social world.Note: Some colleges or majors might require the completion of specific GWS, GQ, GHA, GN, GA, GH, and/or GS courses.

3.0 Hrs. required.

AAA S Evolving Status of Blacks in the Twentieth Century: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
3.0

Additional Requirements

All courses must be taken and any degree course group requirements (if any) must be met.

First-Year Seminar

Courses with the suffix S, T, or X or PSU abbreviation satisfy this requirement The First-Year Seminars (FYS) are designed to engage students in learning, acquaint them with the learning tools and resources available at Penn State and orient them to the scholarly community from the outset of their undergraduate studies in a way that will bridge to later experiences in their chosen majors. In addition, the FYS facilitate students' adjustment to the high expectations, demanding workload, increased academic liberties, and other aspects of the transition to college life and introduce them to their responsibilities as members of the University community. The seminars are taught by full-time, regular Penn State faculty and, as the name implies, are conducted in small sections, thus providing opportunities for students to develop relationships with full-time faculty and other students in academic areas of interest to them.Each baccalaureate student must complete at least 1 credit of the First-Year Seminar. Some colleges may, however, call for the completion of more than 1 credit of the FYS. Students will typically enroll in the FYS offered by the college in which they plan to graduate. If a student changes his/her college of enrollment, it is not necessary to retake the FYS offered by the new college.Not all seminars are available at all Penn State campuses and some enrollment restrictions apply. Associate degree students are strongly encouraged to complete the FYS requirement even though they are not required to do so.NOTE: Beginning with the 2009 summer session, the First-Year Seminar requirement will be replaced by First-Year Engagement requirements for each University Park academic college, each of the nineteen Commonwealth campuses, and the Division of Undergraduate Studies. Students at the University Park campus will be required to complete at least 1 credit of first-year seminar and meet any other first-year requirements specified by their home college. Students at the Commonwealth campuses will be required to complete the first-year experiences specified by their campus. First-year students entering Penn State in summer 2009 and thereafter should consult their enrollment home for these requirements.

1 courses required.

A E Architectural Engineering Orientation
1.0

United States Cultures

Courses with the US designation satisfy this requirement A course that fulfills the United States Cultures requirement must strive to increase students' understanding of contemporary United States society. Such a course need not focus exclusively on the present and may concern a historical subject.Courses with the United States Cultures designation will include two or more of the following components and will include those components in the graded evaluation of student performance: 1. Cultivate student knowledge of issues of social identity such as ethnicity, race, class, religion, gender, physical/mental disability, age, or sexual orientation;    2. Convey to students knowledge of different United States values, traditions, beliefs, and customs;    3. Increase student knowledge of the range of United States cultural achievements and human conditions through time;   4. Increase student knowledge of United States social identities not in isolation, but in relation to one another (for example, the interaction of race or gender with socioeconomic status).

1 courses required.

Requirement Satisfied

1 courses required.

International Cultures

Courses with the IL designation satisfy this requirement A course that fulfills the International Cultures requirement must strive to increase student knowledge of the variety of international societies and may deal to some extent with U.S. culture in its international connections. It need not focus exclusively on the present and may, indeed, be a historical subject. Courses with the International Cultures designation will do two or more of the following: 1. Cultivate student knowledge of the similarities and differences among international cultures;    2. Convey to students knowledge of other nations' cultural values, traditions, beliefs, and customs;    3. Increase students' knowledge of the range of international cultural achievements and human conditions through time;    4. Increase students' knowledge of nations and cultures not in isolation, but in relation to one another.Students may also take a variety of foreign studies courses offered in foreign countries.

1 courses required.

Requirement Satisfied

1 courses required.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

3 of these 24 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR, GENERAL EDUCATION, or ELECTIVES and 0-12 credits are included in ELECTIVES if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.

All courses must be taken and any degree course group requirements (if any) must be met.

Foreign Language

Student must attain 12th credit level of proficiency in one foreign language. See the ADMISSION section of the General Information in this bulletin for the Placement Policy for Penn State Foreign Language Courses (under Opportunities for Credit by Acquisition).

1 courses required.

Arabic

All courses must be taken and any degree course group requirements (if any) must be met.

ARAB Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic
4.0
ARAB Elementary Modern Standard Arabic I
4.0
ARAB Elementary Modern Standard Arabic II
4.0

B.A. Fields

Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Arts, Foreign Languages, Natural Sciences, Quantification (may not be taken in the area of the student's primary major; foreign language credits in this category must be in a second foreign language or beyond the 12th credit level of proficiency in the first language)

9.0 Hrs. required.

Other Cultures

Select 3 credits from approved list. Students may count courses in this category in order to meet other major, minor, elective, or General Education requirements, except for the General Education US/IL requirement.

1 courses required.

A&A Introduction to International Arts
3.0

Requirements for the Major

A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82-44.

All courses must be taken and any degree course group requirements (if any) must be met.

Additional Courses

All courses must be taken and any degree course group requirements (if any) must be met.

Additional Courses

Students must meet with a faculty advisor to approve their course selections from the following areas:

5 courses required.

COMM Television Field Production
3.0
COMM Television Studio Production
3.0
COMM Audio Production
3.0
COMM Telecommunications Promotion and Sales
3.0
COMM Media Programming Strategies
3.0

Free Electives

For the B.A. degree in Telecommunications, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

20.0 Hrs. required.

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